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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of Sphagum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings found in the catalog.

Sphagum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings

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Published by Gov"t Print. Off. .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23456793M
OCLC/WorldCa23085667

In World War I, Sphagnum mosses were used as first-aid dressings on soldiers' wounds, as these mosses said to absorb liquids three times faster than cotton, retain liquids better, better distribute liquids uniformly throughout themselves, and are cooler, softer, and be less irritating. It is also claimed to have antibacterial properties. Sphagnum moss also makes a good packing material for protecting delicate items in transit, it can be used as a cotton wool substitute and as a potting material for many species of orchid. The semi-decomposed plant, excavated from bogs, is a first rate soil conditioner and is also used in seed and potting composts.

To read this book online, your options are Join Forgotten Books 1,, books Unlimited reading Dedicated support Small monthly fee Click here to learn more . Definition of Peat moss. 1. Noun. A common name of sphagnum. ¹. ¹ Source: Medical Definition of Peat moss. 1. A highly absorbent moss used as a substitute for absorbent cotton or gauze in surgical dressing and sanitary napkins. Synonym: muskeag moss, peat moss. (05 Mar ) Lexicographical Neighbors of Peat Moss.

  George E. Nichols, Sphagnum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings, Annual Smithsonian Report (), pp. . This very important book, published in by the Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Survey, appeared Cross on the Sphagna used for surgical dressings. The publications Sphagnum moss: war substitute for cotton in absorbent surgical dressings. Ann. .


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Sphagum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sphagnum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings George Elwood Nichols U.S. Government Printing Office, - Bandages and bandaging - 14 pages. Book Language. English; Book Format. Paperback; War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings.

Paperback More Buying Choices $ (1 used offer) Sphagnum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings (Classic Reprint) by George E.

Nichols | Paperback $ $ 7. FREE Shipping on orders. absorbent material out of sphagnum moss."2 But the use of sphagnum moss as a wound dressing has a much longer history; during the Great War it played an important part as a substitute for cotton gauze dressings.

At the height of the war, on 30 Januarythe Canadian Red Cross Society commissioned Jean I. Sphagnum moss: war substitute for cotton in absorbent surgical dressings / By George E.

(George Elwood) Nichols Topics: War wounds, Surgical dressings. As the war raged on, the number of bandages needed skyrocketed, and sphagnum moss provided the raw material for more and more of them. Inthe Canadian Red Cross Society in Ontario provided Author: Lorraine Boissoneault.

Though many previously used fibres and materials were tried, sphagnum moss, which had been judged beneficial in by G. Neuber, a German surgeon, and which had been adopted by the French War Department in as an absorbent dressing, became popular because of. Sphagnum moss: war substitute for cotton in absorbent surgical dressings.

By Prof. George E. Nichols, Osborn Botanical Laboratory, Yale University. Wound dressing in World War I – the kindly Sphagnum Moss. By Peter Ayres. “The moss is now used mostly for hanging baskets because it’s so absorbent but it also has antiseptic qualities which made it a great substitute for cotton in thick bandages.

The war took place before the discovery of penicillin, so its ability to both staunch open wounds and inhibit bacterial growth made it. Ethnopharmacological relevance. Sphagnum mosses and peat could have been utilized as wound dressings for centuries, however reliable data on this subject are ambiguous; sometimes even no distinction between peat moss (Sphagnum spp.) and peat is made or these terms become confused.

The first scientific account on surgical use of peat comes from a peat digger who successfully. Nichols, G.E. () Sphagnum moss: war substitute for cotton in absorbent dressings, in Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institutionpp Washington: Government Printing Office.

Porter, J.B. () Sphagnum moss for use as a surgical dressing; its collection, preparation and other details. Canadian Medical. George E. Nichols, “Sphagnum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings,” Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution [], This word was suggested by Dan Day in the Office of Communications.

The reported uses of sphagnum as a wound dressing for over years are reviewed. Nichols GE The sphagnum moss and its use in surgical dressings. Journal N Y Botanical Garden ; - Peat is formed not only (or not solely) by more or less decayed Sphagnum plants, and the names peat and Sphagnum were often confused in writings about medicinal peloids and moss dressings (see.

The Vikings were known to have used sphagnum moss as an early form of toilet paper, other uses included nappies and sanitary towel substitutes. The German Army was the first to re-invent the sphagnum moss wound dressing, a move that was quickly adopted by the British Forces as.

Indeed, it was found to make a better dressing than cotton (58). However, the value of sphagnum in surgery was apparently not fully appreciated until World War I, and by the end of the war the total British output of sphagnum dressings is estimated to have been about one million pounds per month (74).

During World War I (), septic wounds were rife and sterile bandages in short supply on all sides. Used since the Bronze Age to staunch wounds, peat moss (Sphagnum spp.) became literally, a lifesaver, being twice as absorbent as cotton and containing antiseptic iodine.

Volunteers rallied around Europe and North America to collect. ANDO H.: Proc. Bryol. Soc. Jap.2. ANDO H., MATSUO A.: Applied Bryology, (w:) W. Schultze-Motel (ed.), Advances in Bryology, vol. J. Mosses and liverworts, apart from peat provided by the former, have not been of significance in furnishing useful products.

They are, however, of importance in the general economy of nature, and have been used in a variety of ways.

This use of moss peat might be extended to include the packing and storing of certain animal products. 6 CIRCULAR 16 7, U. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE A few species of peat- forming Sphagnum mosses were used for surgical dressings in the World "War, and the absorbent and de- Figure 3.

George E. Nichols, “Sphagnum Moss: War Substitute for Cotton in Absorbent Surgical Dressings,” Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution [], This word was suggested by Dan Day in. The chief of the cotton goods section of the Quartermaster General’s Office, a representative of the War Industries Board, and a representative of the surgical dressings manufacturers met with the mill producers of the Fall River district on Febru 16 It was found that an artificial market had been created, due largely to the fact.W.

(a) Sphagnum as a Surgical Drm/«g,Northwest Division of the American Red Cross []; (b) 'Sphagnum from Bog to Bandage', Publications of the Puget Sound Biol. Station, Univ. Washington,2, A shortage of absorbent cotton necessitated the widespread use of peatmoss, or sphagnum, as a standard dressing in war hospitals.

After the War. After the war, the peacetime use in of moss in surgical dressings was continued on a small scale. A article detailing the pharmaceutical uses of moss mentioned that the Sphagnum Products Company made bandages using moss, but the industry did not develop.